Free Middle School Summer Program

Our free Middle School Summer Program is getting some love from the local press. Click here for the full story in the BPC Broadsheet.

They write that, “Children participate in a wide variety of programs, from sports and arts and science to film making and theater. Parents and middle school students can choose a different activity for every week in July.” We can’t wait to start these programs and share the summer with youth from all over New York City.

Click here for more info and to register for the program!

And here are the movies we made during our Spring Break Filmaking Intensive, which were shown during the Tribeca Film Festival.

Secret Self

Tapioca pudding with caramelized peaches

Those clear and fun bubbles that you eat when you drink bubble tea are called tapioca pearls. They are the starch from the cassava root and are a staple food in South America and Africa. They are also the main ingredients in this delicious pudding. I chose to pair this pudding with juicy caramelized peaches because they will go well with the pudding and their season is just beginning. Peaches are a stone fruit like apricots and plums.  They are member of the rose family and are related to almonds. Georgia is the peach state, but California grows the most in the U.S. The United States provides one quarter of the world peach supply.

TAPIOCA VANILLA PUDDING WITH CARAMELIZED PEACHES
Recipe by Isabelle Lapin

Preparation:  30 minutes
Cooking:  15-20 minutes
8 adult portions

Ingredients:
2 cups coconut milk
4 cups milk
½ cup tapioca
1 tsp. vanilla extract
2 Tbsp. sugar
8 ripe peaches
2 oz. honey
1 oz. sugar
2 oz. butter
¼ cup orange juice
Chopped pumping seeds for decoration (or chopped pistachios if you are not allergic)

Preparation:
Pudding:
Put milk, sugar and tapioca in a pot. Cook it on low heat while mixing constantly until the tapioca pearls are translucent. Turn the fire off and let it cool. It will thicken while cooling. Add the vanilla and mix.
Caramelized peaches:
Cut the peaches in quarters.  Mix them with sugar and juice and set aside. Melt the butter and honey on high heat until light caramelized.  Drain the peaches from the marinade but keep it to make a sauce. Add the quarters of peaches to the caramel.  Coat the peaches well.  Boil the juice for one minute and pour it over the peaches.
Put a tablespoon of peach on the bottom of dessert cups then cover with some pudding. Decorate the top with some more peaches and sauce. Sprinkle with chopped pumping seeds.

Tips and info:
You can use other seasonal fruits, use only milk or almond or soy milk if you have allergies. You spice the caramel with star anis or any other spice you like. The decoration is also up to your taste and can go from pistachios to whipped cream.
The name Tapioca is derived from the word tipi’óka, the name for this starch in the Tupi language of South America.  Tapioca is gluten-free, and almost completely protein-free.  Tapioca comes from the root of the cassava. It is the starch of the cassava root.  After rice and wheat, the most important human carbohydrate source is cassava, also named manioc and yucca, it is a staple food in South America and Africa.  It’s the main ingredient in tapioca pudding and in bubble teas.
Peaches have been growing since prehistoric times were first cultivated in China.  The Chinese believe the peach is a symbol of long life and immortality.  The peach spread from China to Persia and then Europe.  The Romans believed the peach originated from Persia and named it the Persian apple.  The first peach tree was planted in Florida in the early 1500’s.  Peaches are now growing in Georgia, South Carolina, Colorado, Pennsylvania, Washington, Michigan, and New Jersey. They are a stone fruit like plums and apricots.  They are a member of the rose family and are related to almonds. Georgia is known as the peach state, but California grows the most peaches in the U.S.  The United States provides one quarter of the world peach supply.

vegetarian corn chowder

The word “chowder” was invented long before the pilgrims saw Cape Cod.  Fishermen from various parts of Europe were fishing around Newfoundland since 1497.  They transformed the word “Chaudron”, the pot in which French fishermen made their stews, into the word chowder. Those early chowders were different from our own.  Corn is a summer vegetable grown everywhere but Antarctica. U.S. is the biggest producer with 40% of the world harvest.

VEGETARIAN CORN CHOWDER

Recipe by Isabelle Lapin

Preparation: 30 min
Cooking: 30 to 45 min
Makes 12 adult portions

Corn Chowder 03

 

Ingredients:
8 fresh ears corn
3 Tbsp. butter
1 chopped big onion
2 tsp. fresh thyme
Salt and pepper and sugar
¼ cup all-purpose flour
5 cups non-chicken chicken broth or water
12 oz. yellow potatoes cubed (optional)
1-cup half-and-half
3 Tbsp. chopped fresh basil

Preparation:
Remove the corn kernels from the cob with a knife. You should have 5 to 6 cups.  Then using a peeler scrape the cobs into a kitchen towel. Squeeze the pulp until dry over a bowl (you should have about 2/3 cup juice).  In a big pot melt the butter and sauté the onion with the thyme and 2 teaspoons salt and 1-teaspoon pepper. Cook until the onion begins to brown. Stir the flour and cook for 2 minutes.  Whisking constantly, gradually add water or broth and bring to a boil. Add the kernels and the potatoes and reduce to simmer until the potatoes are soft.  Transfer 2 cups of the chowder to a blender and process until smooth.  Return to the pot, add the half and half and simmer.  Remove from heat and add the corn juice.  Taste and season with salt, pepper and sugar.  Sprinkle each serving with fresh chopped basil.

Tip and info:
Add pieces of vegetarian meat or pieces of smoked turkey on top, right before serving. If you don’t have enough corn juice, add enough water to get 2/3 cup.
Chowder is one of the first European-American Dishes.  According to some historians, the word “chowder” was invented long before the pilgrims saw Cape Cod.  Fishermen from various parts of Europe were fishing around Newfoundland since 1497.  They transformed the word “Chaudron”, the pot in which French fishermen made their stews, into the word chowder. Those early chowders were different from our own.  There was no milk (the nearest cow was thousands of miles away). They were no potatoes; this was several centuries before the potatoes arrived from South America to North America via Europe. The clam and cod soup was thicken with ship’s biscuits and flavored with onions. Now the word chowder is used for a variety of soups, with ingredients ranging from salmon to corn.  Corn Chowder 04
Corn is a traditional summer food.  The Native Americans grew it more than 7,000 years ago in Central America.  Native Americans used the leaves of sweet corn as chewing gum.  Corn is grown everywhere in the world but Antarctica. On average there are about 800 kernels on an ear of corn in 16 rows. It always has an even number of rows. Most countries call corn maize.  This comes from the Spanish word ‘maiz’. It is a cereal crop that is part of the grass family.  An ear or cob of corn is actually part of the flower and an individual kernel is a seed.  Corn is processed and used in many foods. Its by-products are also found in many non-food items such as glue, paint, laundry detergent, soap, aspirin, cosmetics and many more. Corn is also used to feed livestock and poultry. IN the days of early settlers corn was so valuable that it was used as money and traded for other products such as meat and furs.  United States produces 40% of the world harvest and is the biggest producer with more than 200 million tons in 2012.

Tasty Tuesday – Quinoa tabouli with seasonal fruits

 

Tabouli is a delicious and refreshing Mediterranean salad that is usually made with tomatoes, onions, mint and couscous. I chose to make it sweet with quinoa and seasonal fruits for a light dessert. Quinoa is not a grain, but is actually very close to spinach.  Nasa provides quinoa to its astronauts in space trips due to its exceptional nutritional contents. It is very high in protein so it is very good for vegetarian people. Enjoy!

FRESH SEASONAL FRUITS QUINOA TABOULE
Recipe by Isabelle Lapin

Preparation: 20 minutes
Cooking: 10 minutes
8 adult portions

 Corn Chowder 02

 

Ingredients:

1 cup (150g.) quinoa
1 ¼ oz. (300ml.) water
1 oz. (30g.) Brown sugar
2 ½ oz. (70g.) raisins or less
1 orange Juice and zest
½ pound strawberries
½ cantaloupe
1-pint blueberries
(Seasonal fruits: 1 kiwi, 1 nectarine, 1 apricot, strawberries)
1Tbsp. sunflower seeds
1 Tbsp. pumpkin seeds
3 Tbsp. fresh mint chopped
2 tsp. orange blossom water

Preparation:
Rinse the quinoa.  Cook the quinoa with the water, orange juice, brown sugar, and raisins during at least 15 minutes.  Drain and cool it. Set it aside. Wash the fruits and cut them in medium pieces. Toast the seeds in a pan. Put all the fruits, seeds, orange blossom water, mint. Add the quinoa and mix. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

Corn Chowder

Info and tips:
Use any seasonal fruits, change the herb according to your taste, switch the seeds for pistachios and pine nuts.
Quinoa was used 3,000 to 4,000 years ago in Bolivia, Peru and Columbia.  It served as a staple food in the Incan Diet. The United Nations declared quinoa a “super food” with a protein value equal to that of milk. Quinoa looks like a grain but it is actually not a grain! It is very close to greens (like chard), beets, and spinach. It has a natural covering called saponin (a bitter resin that keeps birds away) and does not need to be treated for cultivation. It is why we must rinse it before cooking.  Quinoa contains 15% protein and 70% carbohydrates. It is considered a complete source of protein because it includes all 9 essential amino acids. It is gluten-free and also contains vital minerals, such as magnesium, iron, copper and phosphorus.  Nasa provided quinoa to its astronauts in space trips due to its exceptional nutritional contents.
Tabouli or Taboulé (in French) or originally Tabouleh, is a delicious savory salad made from a variety of ingredients that primarily include lots of parsley, bulgur or couscous, mint, spring onions, and tomatoes. It also includes olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper. A traditionally Arabic salad, it has become very popular worldwide.  Chefs around the world create their own version that can be also sweet for a very summery dessert.  Here I replaced the couscous by quinoa but any other grain can be used.
Cantaloupe derives its name from the town of Cantalupo, Italy, where cantaloupe seeds arrived from Armenia and were planted in the Papal Gardens in the 16th century. It has been growing in the Nile Valley in Egypt since ancient times.  The US cantaloupe is frequently called muskmelon.  However muskmelon is a family of melon that includes the cantaloupe, honeydew, and casaba melon. Cantaloupe is a member of a vine-crop family which includes others melons, squash, cucumbers, pumpkins and gourds. Today, they are produced in California, Arizona, and Texas and are available throughout the year but the peak season is the summer. When choosing a cantaloupe use your nose – pick the cantaloupe that has a sweet smell because it does not ripen after being picked, so it will not sweeten any further.

Final Tritons Swim Meet Wrap Up!

Thanks for a great 2014-2015 Triton Swim Team season and a fantastic final swim meet!

Last week we saw swimmers post 90 Best Times (out of a total 103 swims!), 12 swimmers drop 10 seconds or more off a previous best time, and 4 new team records!

Our “Ten off the Top” swimmers this meet were:deanswim
Aiden C. – 12 second drop – 50 Free
Aiden C. – 18 second drop – 50 Back
Aryan S. – 11 second drop – 50 Free
Charlie K. – 25 second drop – 50 Back
Gabi T. – 17 second drop – 50 Back
Grace P. – 19 second drop – 50 Breast
Jasmin J.-H. – 10 second drop – 100 Free
Lilli T. – 10 second drop – 50 Free
Maia B. – 18 second drop – 50 Back
Maia B. – 18 second drop – 50 Fly
Olivia C. – 14 second drop – 50 Fly
Shozo T. – 22 second drop – 50 Breast
Stella K. – 10 second drop – 50 Free
Zoe J. – 10 second drop – 50 Free

And our new team record holders are:
Jake Henschel – 50 Freestyle
Jake Henschel – 50 Backstroke
Tommy Creighton – 50 Freestyle
Tristan Kunzle – 50 Breast

We will look forward to seeing everyone at practice through June 18th (swimmers will also be receiving their Best Times certificates at practice), and at our End-of-the-Year Party on Friday, June 19th!

Congratulations, everyone! We’re so proud of all of our Tritons swimmers!

Very Best,
Tritons Coaches

Click here for a complete list of times and results: Tritons Team Records Final Spring 2015

This Weekend at the Center — Swimming and Songs

Congratulations to all the participants at this past weekends dance and art show! In case you missed it, Manhattan Youth held a dance show, directed by Susan Kay, at MS289 on Saturday, celebrating amazing artwork! After the show, we invited families and participants to view students’ artwork in the Great Hall of the Downtown Community Center! Thank you to everyone who helped and stopped by.

Booster Swim Lessons begin next week!
Our popular Booster swim lessons are a great way to jump-start swimming for the Summer! Through these week-long sessions swimmers swim for an hour each day, consisting of a structured swim lesson followed by supervised water exploration, free swim, and pool games led by our instructors. Click here for registration information, or email swim@manhattanyouth.orgSessions are offered throughout June, but space is filling quickly so reserve your child’s spot today!

Join Manhattan Youth in The World’s Largest Swimming Lesson!
The nation’s top water safety organizations are coming together to present The World’s Largest Swimming Lesson on Thursday, June 18, 2015. WLSL was created to build awareness about the importance of teaching the life skill of swimming. Manhattan Youth has been involved in The World’s Largest Swimming Lesson for the past 3 years! In 2014, 36,564 swimmers from 22 countries broke the Guinness World Record. On June 18th, pools around the world will host local WLSL lessons at 10 a.m. in an attempt to again break the record. Let’s break it again this year! This event is FREE for DCC Members but registration is required.
Contact swim@manhattanyouth.org for more information, or stop by the Front Desk to sign up.

Songs for Seeds!
Registration is now open for Songs for Seeds summer session.
Songs for Seeds is a rockin’ music program that encourages children newborn to 5 years to sing, dance and play along with a live, three-piece band. Kids rock out with children’s instruments, as well as real drums, guitars, keyboards and instruments from around the world.
To register, contact Lisa at downtown@songsforseeds.com.

For more info on events and classes, check out our Spring Schedule!
For pics and updates, follow us on Instagram: @manhattanyouth

Here’s the full weekend schedule:
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Tasty Tuesday — Ratatouille or Vegetable Stew

No, Ratatouille is not only the name of Remy’s rat in the Disney movie. It is a summer vegetable stew from the Occitan cuisine, in Provence, a Mediterranean area. It was probably invented in the 18th century. There is no rule as to eat it cold with a slice of baguette during a Sunday picnic or hot as a side dish with roast chicken or fish. The important thing is to let it simmer until all the vegetables melt together, the longer, the better. Enjoy!

RATATOUILLLE OR VEGETABLE STEW
Recipe by Isabelle LapinRatatouille2

Preparation: 25 min
Cooking: 55 min
Makes 8 adult portions

Ratatouille1

Ingredients:
12.25oz. (350g.) eggplant cubed 1” pieces
12.25 oz. (350g.) zucchini cubed 1” pieces
12.25 oz. (350g.) peppers (red and green)
12.25 oz. (350g.) onion diced 1” pieces
17.5 oz. (500g.) ripped tomatoes
3 garlic cloves minced
6 Tbsp. olive oil
1 sprig fresh thyme
1 bay leaf
Salt and pepper

Preparation:
Peel and cut the tomatoes, the eggplants and the zucchinis. Dice the onions. In a large pot heat 2 Tbsp. of olive oil, fry the onions and the pepper until tender. Add the tomatoes, the minced garlic, the thyme and bay leaf. Season with salt and pepper. Cover and simmer for 45 minutes. Meanwhile, sauté the eggplant and zucchini in a pan with olive oil for 15 minutes. Taste the vegetables, they must be very tender. Add the eggplant and zucchini into the pot with the pepper mixture and cook 10 minutes more. Taste and add salt and pepper to taste.

Tips and Info:
I advise to simmer the stew as long as possible. The stew will be even better the next day.
The word ratatouille comes from the Occitan ratatolha and the recipe comes from Occitan cuisine. It originated in Provence. In 1778, the word ratatouille designated a rough stew; it is only I the twentieth century that the word takes the meaning we know today.
“The secret of a good ratatouille is to cook the vegetables separately so each will taste truly of itself.” Joël Robuchon (a very famous French chef). But you can simply cook all the vegetables together for a longer time.
Eggplants originate from India. It came to Europe in the 16th century, period in which this decorative plant is considered poisonous. Tomato came from Mexico and was brought to Europe in the 16th century. Its size was one of the cherry tomato we know now. It came to Paris under the Revolution with volunteers from Marseille.
Zucchinis are also from America. They are squashes picked up before they are ripe. They were called zucchinis in 1929.
Sweet peppers also originated from America. They were an integral part of the Indian American diet with corn, beans and squash. If we take off from the ratatouille the Indian eggplant and the American squash, tomato and pepper, onions, garlic and olives are the only vegetables left. Olives were brought to Provence from Asia via Greece in the 6th century. So only garlic and onions are from Europe and this recipe was probably invented only in the 18th century.
Bay leaves or Laurel were use in Ancient Greece and Rome as wreaths to crown their victors. Champions of the Olympic games wore garlands of bay leaves. Our word “baccalaureate” means, “laurel berries” and signifies the successful completion of one’s studies.

Tasty Tuesday — The Salad Nicoise d’Isabelle

Blue sky and sunny days call for light meals. Salad Niçoise with a piece of baguette is a whole meal by itself.  Easy, fast and delicious, what else can we ask for? It was created by the fishermen who leaved around Nice on the Riviera and was considered a poor man’s meal for a long time.  Now you can find this salad on the menu of all the French bistro everywhere in the world. But I don’t know if we can still call it Niçoise at that point!

SALADE NICOISE
Recipe by Isabelle LapinSalad-Nicoise1

Preparation: 30 min
Cooking: 10 min
Makes: 6 to 8 adults portions

Ingredients:
2 bags mesclun saladSalad-Nicoise2 1 medium red pepper
1 medium green pepper
6 small purple artichokes (or 300g. 10.5 oz. string beans)
¼ bunch radishes
3 medium tomatoes
1 cucumber
75g. (2.5oz.) black olives (Niçoise if possible)
100g. Fresh fava without skin (optional)
6 pinch sea salt
6 cl. (2floz.) Extra virgin oil
3cl. (1floz.) Balsamic vinegar
1 medium red onion
1 bunch fresh basil
2 to 3 cans tuna in olive oil
3 to 4 hard-boil eggs
Salt and pepper

Preparation:
Peel the peppers with a peeler, and then cut into stripes. Peel the onion and chop finely. Cut the tomatoes into quarters. Cut the stems of the radishes and wash them.  Peel the cucumber and spoon out the seeds. Slice it thin. If using the artichokes, take off the first few leaves, then with a pairing knife cut around the edge until you reach the soft part. Slice them very thinly and rub some lemon juice on it to avoid blackening. If using string beans, drop them in a pot of salted boiling water for 5 minutes. Taste they should be al-dente. Then drop then into an ice bath to stop the cooking.  It is called “blanch and chock”. Drain the water as much as you can, not to bring water into your salad. Boil the eggs. Peel them and quarter them. Drain the oil from the cans of tuna. Organize the Mesclun salad on a flat serving tray.  Then put artistically the other vegetables on it. Make the dressing with chop basil, extra virgin oil, Balsamic vinegar, salt and pepper. Pour on top of the salad before serving.

Tips and info:
You can omit or change some vegetables according to your taste, but this is one of the original recipes. Some people don’t put tuna but anchovies instead. Some others don’t put string beans or eggs.
Salad Niçoise comes from the region of Nice, which is city in the South of France. Swamps and also dry lands surrounded Nice, so it was not easy to cultivate.  The local cuisine was done with what farmers grew in the region: zucchini, olives, tomatoes, onions and fish from the Mediterranean Sea. Salad Niçoise was a poor man’s dish that fishermen ate when they came back from their fishing trips.  They used the fish they caught and added local and seasonal vegetables. The seasoning was very simple. It included garlic, salt and olive oil.  Today people add hard-boiled eggs, string beans, and fresh basil. They also sometimes add cucumbers, fava beans, red and green peppers, mesclun salad, artichokes, celery and red onions to this salad but not all at the same time. You can add wine vinegar and pepper to the seasoning, but it must not overwhelm the taste of the vegetables.

Tasty Tuesday — Cherry and Cheese Danish

We owe this delicious pastry to a strike! As the story goes, in 1850 bakery workers in Denmark went on strike. It forced the owners to hire workers from abroad, among them several Austrian bakers, who brought along new baking traditions and pastry recipes. So it is really an Austrian pastry called Wienerbrod, or “Vienna Bread.” The Danish bakers adjusted these recipes to their own liking, and it became what we now know as Danish pastry. In the United States, a Danish immigrant, Lauritz Klitteng popularized this pastry around 1915-1920.
I chose to add cherries to our danish because cherry season is beginning, and they are sweet and juicy. Cherries are the same family as roses and began to be farmed in the 1850′s in Washington State. Bing cherries are the most popular sweet cherries and were named after Chinese cherry farm workers. Cheese and cherry filling is a wonderful combination that compliments this buttery yeast dough perfectly. Enjoy!
Danish2

CHERRY AND CHEESE FILLED DANISH
Recipe by Isabelle Lapin

Preparation: 30 min
Cooking: 40 min
Proofing till dough double
Makes 8 portions

Ingredients: (12 oz. dough for 1 ring)
¾ oz. (1Tbsp.+1 tsp.; 12g. dry yeast) fresh yeast
½ cup warm milk
3 cups (390g.) all-purpose flour
¼ cup (50g.) sugar
1 tsp. (5g.) salt
¼ tsp. baking powder
8 oz. (226g.; 2 sticks) cold butter cut in pieces
2 large eggs (100g.)
Cherry and Cream cheese filling:
6 oz. (12 Tbsp.) pitted fresh cherries
8 oz. soften cream cheese
3 Tbsp. sugar
1 tsp. vanilla extract
1 large egg yolk
Danish1Preparation:
Combine the yeast and the warm milk and pinch of sugar. It should become frothy and bubbly. If it does not make bubbles your yeast is dead and you must change it. Combine all the dry ingredients in the bowl of a stand mixer with the paddle attachment. Mix, then add the butter and process until it resembles coarse meal. You can do that with two knives or your fingertips. Add the eggs and yeast mixture. Mix until it makes a soft ball–not sticky. Place in an oiled bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Place the bowl in a warm place. Allow to double in size (about 2 hours). Press down gently to release the gasses and weigh 12 ounces. Roll it into a rectangle 12″ by 8″. Spread the filling and roll the dough jellyroll style. Make 3 cuts around the outside and gather the ends by pinching them together. Put on baking sheet cover with parchment paper and let stand for 1 hour. Brush with egg wash (1 large egg+1 yolk+ pinch salt).
Filling: Preheat the oven at 360F. Cream the cheese. Add the sugar and the vanilla and then the yolk. Add the pitted cherries.

Tips and info: You can use pie filling instead of fresh cherries or cherries in jar. Spread the cream cheese filling first then spread the pie filling against the cheese filling and roll the dough. You can use any flavored filling you like. You can also use fresh seasonal fruits.
We call a certain kind of pastry, filled with cheese or fruit, “Danish pastry.” Is it really from Denmark? Well, Danish pastry may have come to the United States from Denmark. But its name in Denmark suggests that it did not originate there. The Danes call this pastry Wienerbrod, or “Vienna Bread”, and Vienna is a city in Austria. What happened is that in 1850 bakery workers in Denmark went on strike. It forced the owners to hire workers from abroad, among them several Austrian bakers, who brought along new baking traditions and pastry recipes. The Danish bakers adjusted these recipes to their own liking and it became what we know now as Danish pastry.
Danish immigrants brought Danish pastry to the U.S.. Lauritz Klitteng popularized this pastry around 1915-1920. According to Mr. Klitteng, he made Danish pastry for the wedding of President Wilson in December 1915. In 1962, Mr. Gertner befriended the Danish baker who convinced him that Danish pastry might be well received in New York. Mr. Gertner began serving the pastry in his restaurant and it immediately was a success.
It is not known where cherries originated from, but they have been a popular fruit in Europe for centuries. They made their way to the U.S. by European settlers in the 1860’s. Later French settlers planted cherry pits they had brought from Normandie throughout the Great Lake region. But cherry farming really started in the late 1850’s. The most common sweet cherry variety is the Bing cherry. This cherry originated in Oregon (60% with Washington State of the sweet cherries production) and received its name from the Chinese workers on the cherry farm. The Montmorency cherry is the most popular tart variety. Most of the tart cherries are from Michigan (75% of the production of tart cherries) and Wisconsin.

This Weekend — Taste of Tribeca

Have an appetite for amazing food? Come and join us on Greenwich Street (by Harrison Street) and work up that appetite this weekend at Taste of Tribeca, where we’ll have lots of fun activities for you and your family.

Taste of Tribeca 
This Saturday, May 16th from 11:30am to 3:00pm
MY Sports Zone! 
Manhattan Youth has been a leader in sports and fitness programming in lower Manhattan since 1986. So this Saturday at Taste of Tribeca, we’re bringing out MY Sports Zone!
Show us your best Eli Manning impression at the football toss, where accuracy is key. Throw the football through our target tire and win a prize! Or channel your inner Rickie Fowler on our carnival style mini golf course!
We’d love for all of our members to stop by.

Come Play With Clay
Manhattan Youth will also have a clay table. Bring the kids over and watch them have tons of fun working with air-dry clay. They can make anything from animals to small bowls, and you can take your projects home as soon as they’re done!

And we haven’t even mentioned the delicious food from over 70 great neighborhood restaurants! 
This outdoor culinary festival benefits arts and enrichment programs at local public schools, PS 150 and PS 234.
(Some inside info: Get there early!)

Don’t forget to follow us Instagram: @manhattanyouth

And here’s the full Center schedule.
SpringSchedule2015NoMovie