AVP Volleyball Clinic at Pier 25

For the second straight year, the Association of Volleyball Professionals (AVP), who organize the 2016 New York City Open, through their signature youth volleyball initiative, administered our Manhattan Youth Friday Night Beach Volleyball clinic at Pier 25 on June 17, 2016.
AVPVolleyball2016-2
The program was run by AVP’s volleyball coaches and AVP professional Traci Weimer. Together they worked on beach volleyball specifics, drills and fun games. Each child received a special gift from AVP First at the conclusion of the event.
AVPVolleyball2016-1
Manhattan Youth’s Friday Night Beach Volleyball program currently has over 140 registered players ages 10-18. They play each Friday night on the Pier 25 sand volleyball courts from mid May through mid July.
AVPVolleyball2016-3And in the AVP Sunday tournament, our AVP Juniors, Wolf and Anton, took first place! Congrats, guys!

PS 276 end of the year extravaganza!

276-tallent-show1

The After-School program at PS 276  wrapped up the year with a student-led talent show and carnival in the gym. The talent show was organized by a group of 4th and 5th grade students and their counselor assistants. The carnival was set up and run by 276 NJHS members and MY staff.

276-tallent-show2Thanks for a fun day of showing off your skills and having fun!

LMC’s Something Else Dance Team places 2nd at city-wide Step It Up event!

Manhattan Youth at LMC’s Something Else Dance Team competed in Step it Up NYC on Saturday, June 4th at the world-famous Apollo Theater.

The Department of Youth & Community Development’s Step it Up NYC youth engagement program focuses on fusing passion to move with the drive to create change. The Something Else Dance Team chose racial equality as their community service project to develop citywide social campaigns.
The Something Else Dance Team took to the Apollo stage to speak out about racial equality, taking 2nd place in the competition!

Check out the award-winning performance:

Great Job Dancers!

Manhattan Youth Films Selected for New York City Film Festival

On June 18th, at SVA Theater, the 2nd annual SONYC  Film Festival will bring together and celebrate New York City’s young filmmakers. Come join us for a day at the movies!

SigningSoundsScreenshot

A frame from “Signing Sounds,” to be screened at the SONYC Film Festival on June 18.

Of the many submissions, the top 40 short films created by SONYC middle school after-school students will be screened, with 18 coming from Manhattan Youth’s After-School programs.

After the screening, the event features an award Ceremony with prizes such as cameras, filmmaking scholarships, trophies, and movie tickets.

Here is a Link to the Selected Films produced by Manhattan Youth students.

And here is a link to tickets for the festival.

SONYC-Film-Festival

Tasty Tuesdays — Mediterranean Summer Stew: Ratatouille

“The secret of a good ratatouille is to cook the vegetables separately so each will taste truly of itself.” –Joël Robuchon (a very famous French chef).  But to simplify, you can cook all the vegetables together for a longer time. Like any stew, ratatouille is better re-heated and eaten the next day. It can be eaten hot or cold, and it is delicious with a slice of toasted baguette. Enjoy!
The word ratatouille comes from the Occitan ratatolha, and the recipe comes from Occitan cuisine. It originated in Provence. In 1778, the word ratatouille designated a rough stew; only in the twentieth century did the word take the meaning we know today.ratatouille1_2016 ratatouille2_2016

RATATOUILLLE OR VEGETABLE STEW

Recipe by Isabelle Lapin

Preparation: 25 min
Cooking: 55 min
Makes 12 adult portions

Ingredients:
12.25oz. (350g.) eggplant cubed 1” pieces
12.25 oz. (350g.) zucchini cubed 1” pieces
12.25 oz. (350g.) peppers (red and green)
12.25 oz. (350g.) onion diced 1” pieces
17.5 oz. (500g.) ripped tomatoes
3 garlic cloves minced
6 Tbsp. olive oil
1 sprig fresh thyme
1 bay leaf
Salt and pepper

Preparation:
Peel and cut the tomatoes, the eggplants and the zucchinis. Dice the onions. In a large pot heat 2 Tbsp. of olive oil, fry the onions and the pepper until tender. Add the tomatoes, the minced garlic, the thyme and bay leaf. Season with salt and pepper. Cover and simmer for 45 minutes. Meanwhile, sauté the eggplant and zucchini in a pan with olive oil for 15 minutes. Taste the vegetables, they must be very tender. Add the eggplant and zucchini into the pot with the pepper mixture and cook 10 minutes more. Taste and add salt and pepper to taste.

Tips:
I advise you to simmer the stew as long as possible. The stew will be even better the next day.
Eggplants originate from India. It came to Europe in the 16th century, period in which this decorative plant was considered poisonous.
Tomato came from Mexico and was brought to Europe in the 16th century. Its size was one of the cherry tomato we know now. It came to Paris under the Revolution with volunteers from Marseille.
Zucchinis are also from America. They are squashes picked up before they are ripe. They were first called zucchinis in 1929.
Sweet peppers also originated from America. They were an integral part of the Indian American diet with corn, beans and squash.
If we take off from the ratatouille the Indian eggplant and the American squash, tomato and pepper, onions, garlic and olives are the only vegetables left. Olives were brought to Provence from Asia via Greece in the 6th century. So only garlic and onions are from Europe and this recipe was probably invented only in the 18th century.
Bay leaves or Laurel were use in Ancient Greece and Rome as wreaths to crown their victors.  Champions of the Olympic games wore garlands of bay leaves.  Our word “baccalaureate” means, “laurel berries” and signifies the successful completion of one’s studies.

Composting comes to the Center

Summer is almost here!  Summer is the growing season, the sunny season, the season for energy, recreation and fun.  It’s a perfect season to spend at the center.

Our Management and Educational staff met yesterday with Sashti from Lower East Side Ecology Center.

Sashti teaches us all about composting in NYC

Sashti teaches us all about composting in NYC

Sashti introduced us to our new composting worm bin!  Filled with hundreds of hungry worms, we learned about how they will take our café coffee grounds, afterschool apple cores and banana peels, and all the fruit and vegetable tops and peels from our Make a Mess Cooking classes to create composting soil.

worm bin complete!

Our Management staff was excited to learn how to lower our ecological footprint at Manhattan Youth, and our Educational Staff immediately started brainstorming lessons for our Animal Hour, Summer Science and Make a Mess Cook and Compost classes coming this summer.

To learn more about Lower East Side Ecology Center and the fine work they do including City Commuter Composting, E-waste Drop off, recycling and more, visit them at www.lesecologycenter.org.

To our Greenest Summer ever!

Tasty Tuesdays — Crêpes

The origin of crêpes can be traced to the Brittani region (Bretagne) of France. A crêpe is simply the French word for a very thin pancake. The term originated from the Latin term “crispus” which means a flat, nearly crisp texture. Originally, the French referred to them as “galettes” or flat cakes. In the beginning, crêpes were served plain as bread and were made from buckwheat flour. Nowadays crêpes are made of white flour which was very expensive centuries ago.  French children eat their crêpes simply with a sprinkle of sugar or some strawberry jam. But the limit of toppings is your imagination. Enjoy!

 FRENCH PANCAKES:  LES CREPES
Recipe by Isabelle Lapin

Crepes4

Crepes3

Preparation: 15 min
Cooking: 4 min per crêpe
Make around 12 crêpes

Ingredients:
250g (8.8 oz.; 1cup+1Tbsp.) All purpose flour
4 large eggs
500ml. (2.1 cups) milk
2 Tbsp. oil
¼ tsp. salt
Butter to cook
Toppings: chocolate spread, chocolate syrup, sugar, jam, maple syrup, fresh fruits, ice cream, whipped cream…Can also be savory like cheese, deli meats and eggs.

Preparation:
Place all the ingredients in a deep bowl and blend with an immersion blender until just smooth.  You can use a regular blender.  If the mixture is too thick, add a little water to thin it.  Heat enough butter on a frying pan to cover the bottom.  When the butter is hot, pour enough batter while tipping the pan and moving it so the batter will spread all over the bottom of the pan. Put the pan back down on the fire and let it cooked on medium heat until you can see the edge browning.  With a flat spatula flip the crêpe and let it cook a minute. You can add the topping as soon as the crêpe it flipped or when you slide it on a plate.

Tips and info:
The origin of the crêpes can be traced to the Brittani region (Bretagne) of France. A crêpe is simply the French word for a very thin pancake. The term originated from the Latin term “crispus” which means a flat, nearly crisp texture. Originally, the French referred to them as “galettes” or flat cakes. In the beginning, crêpes were served plain as bread and were made from buckwheat flour. At the time, buckwheat flour was readily available and affordable, whereas white flour was a luxury reserved for aristocrats and royalty. All over the world, countries have their own version of pancakes. In France crêpes are the center of a National event. February 2nd celebrates the crêpes. The event is called “la Chandeleur” and French people organize crêpe-flipping contest.

Baker’s Blog — Soft Caramels and Hard Candies

Caramel is sugar that has been cooked until it turns golden. There are 2 methods to caramelizing sugar, the wet method, and the dry method. In the wet method, the sugar is first combined with water and boiled to make syrup. Corn syrup (glucose) or an acid like lemon juice or cream of tartar may be added to prevent crystallization. In the dry method, the sugar is melted in a dry pan. Often an acid like lemon juice is added to the sugar and rubbed in so the crystals are slightly moist. Remember that sugar, when turning to caramel, is very hot, well over 300F (150C). Liquids added to hot caramel could spatter dangerously. Hard candy is simply a flavored (colored) syrup boiled until it is brittle.

SOFT CARAMELS AND HARD CANDIES
Recipe by Isabelle Lapin

SoftCaramels

Soft Caramel:
Preparation: 15 min
Cooking: 20 min
Cooling: 3 hours (overnight better)
Makes 3 Lbs

Ingredients:
6 cups (1 ½ L) heavy cream
1 ½ Lbs. (750g.) sugar
6.5 oz. (200g.) corn syrup
2 tsp. kosher salt or any flaky or chunky salt more for sprinkling
6½ oz. (200g) butter
1 Tbsp. vanilla extract

Preparation: Oil a pan of your choice and cover it with oiled parchment paper. Combine the cream, sugar, and corn syrup in a heavy saucepan. Bring to a boil, stirring to dissolve the sugar. Turn the heat to low and cook, stirring until the mixture reaches 230F (110C). Add the butter and vanilla. Continue to cook slowly, stirring constantly until the mixture reaches 245F (118C). Pour onto the pan. Wait 15 minutes to sprinkle the salt. Allow the mixture to cool completely before cutting into squares.

Tips and info: After adding the butter you can add 3 1/5 ounces of dark chocolate (70% cocoa) or milk chocolate to the caramel to make chocolate caramels.

Old Fashioned Hard candies:

Preparation: 5 minSoftCaramels1

Cooking: 40 min
Makes 16 servings

Ingredients:

2 cups sugar
1-cup water
2/3-cup corn syrup
1 tsp. lemon oil (peppermint or other flavored oils)
1 tsp. yellow food coloring

Preparation: Sprinkle a cookie sheet with confectioner’s sugar and set aside. In a heavy bottomed saucepan, stir together the white sugar, water and corn syrup until sugar has dissolved. Bring to a boil over medium heat and cook until it reaches 300 to 310F. Remove from heat, and stir in the flavored oil and the coloring. Immediately pour the sugar mixture onto the prepared cookie sheet. When the candy is cool enough for the outer edge to hold its shape, cut into bite size pieces with a pair of scissors.

Tips and info: Hard candy is simply a flavored (colored) syrup boiled until  brittle. You can cut them out into shapes and colored to your taste.

This Week at the Center – a photo slideshow

Here’s a small sample of this week’s morning Center classes.

Scroll through the slideshow below to see Make a Mess: Science, Mommy & Me Ceramics, MY Move, and Music Singalongs.
This week at the Center

Learn more here.

VEGETARIAN SUSHIS

Sushi was first created in Southeast Asia. At it’s inception, it was a piece of fermented fish wrapped in sour rice. The seasoned rice was used to preserve the fish. The dish spread to China, and eventually to Japan, where the version we know originated. The sushi that we’re most familiar with today was invented by Hanaya Yohei in Japan sometime at the end of the Edo period, around 1868. They began as cheap fast food, because it was essentially a quick snack to eat with your hands. Traditionally, only sashimi, which is raw slices of fish, is eaten with chopsticks.

VEGETARIAN SUSHIS:Recipe by Isabelle Lapin

Vegetable-sushi2

Preparation: 30 min
Cooking: 30 min
Makes: 10 full-sized rolls

Ingredients:
3 Lb. 8 oz. (1.59 kg) short grain rice
64 fl. oz. (1.92 L) water
6 fl. oz. (180 ml) unseasoned Japanese rice vinegar
vegetable-sushi-3 2-¼ oz. (35 g) fine sea salt
Zucchini, yellow squash, carrots, cucumbers, avocadosImitation crabsticks
Extra firm tofu cut in sticks
Cold omelet cut lengthwise
Cream cheese (dairy or tofu)
Seaweed leaves

Preparation:
Rinse the rice under cold water until the water runs semi-clear. Drain well. In a deep dish, combine the rice with water. Steam the rice until it’s almost completely cooked, after about 30 minutes. Cover and let it rest for 10 minutes. Combine the salt and vinegar. Warm over low heat to dissolve the salt but do not let the mixture boil. Cool at room temperature. Transfer the rice to 2 plates and drizzle the vinegar mixture. “Cut” and fold the rice over using a wooden rice paddle or flat wooden spatula. Continue until the mixture has cooled.
Cut all the desired vegetables into sticks ¼ inch thick. Make the sushi rolls.

Tip:
The vinegar mixture is optional. You can use plain sushi rice. Wrap your sushi mat in plastic wrap it will be easier to clean. Do not put too much rice and filling on the seaweed leaf otherwise it won’t close. You can create any kind of sushi rolls, using cooked sweet potatoes and butternut squash, even dessert ones with your favorite fruits. Make a fruit or chocolate sauce to dip your dessert sushi.

Info:
Sushi rolls are called Maki, from the Japanese Makisu, which is the bamboo mat we use to make the rolls. The Japanese people prefer nigiri, which is a piece of fish pressed on top of a strip of rice. Maki can be wrapped in soy paper, cucumber or egg, not just Nori seaweed. There are 10,000 recognized varieties of seaweed in the world.  Many seaweeds look like plants and are categorized by their color: green, brown, or red algae.